Tacking Point Lighthouse

Tacking Point Lighthouse

Tacking Point Lighthouse, perched high atop a rocky outcropping, looks out over Lighthouse Beach and offers beautiful views of the coast. The explorer Matthew Flinders tacked off the coast here in the early 1800s, giving the point its name. The lighthouse was built in 1879 to the design of James Barnet, a colonial architect from New South Wales, and is still operational today.

The lighthouse isn’t open to the public, but it makes a great postcard photo. The foundations of the lighthouse keepers’ cottage can also be seen, as well as legends of the keepers’ lonely life. The sweeping vistas of the rugged and rocky coast, though, are what really steal the show. During the migratory season, you might even see whales here.

 

This picturesque area, surrounded by lush rain forest, is also a culturally significant landmark for the Birpai tribe, the region’s Aboriginal people. It was a key observation point from which they could watch fish runs and harvest bush tucker (food) from the surrounding trees.

 

You can either walk up the stairs from Lighthouse Beach or drive up to the lighthouse’s summit, though parking is limited. The Port Macquarie Coastal Walk can also be started from here.